St Mawes - Cornwall

St Mawes CornwallThe ethereal local gardens with its breathtaking flora and fauna are more than sufficient to lure any curious visitor to the attractive, quaint fishing village of St Mawes. Situated at the farthest end of the Roseland peninsula in Cornwall, St Mawes’ unique mild climatic conditions and sub Mediterranean summers are a result of it geographically kissing the Gulf Stream. Numerous activities and facilities are accessible in this exclusive waterside village, which promise to entertain guests, as according to their budget and requirements.

St Mawes rests on the east bank of Carrick Roads which is a huge waterway. As a result of an ancient valley which melted after the Ice Age, the sea level increased dramatically, paving the way for a natural harbour. It is said to be the third largest harbour in the world.

A haven for those who thrive in boating and yachting, this part of Cornwall welcomes enthusiasts from all over the Roseland Peninsula with its anchorages and sprawling boatyards. St Mawes is also known for its popular sailing club which hosts racing events and entertainment for all. The menus of the local eateries and restaurants offer mouthwatering delicacies laden with fresh seafood and traditional meals. Those who love to indulge in a gastronomical journey will find this area to be a perfect spot.

St Mawes Fish Festival Sloping to the sea, this pretty village is lined with attractive villas, gardens and thatched cottages. Overlooking the breathtaking River Fal and Falmouth, St Mawes is also a bustling yachting harbour. The village attracts thousands of visitors annually and accommodation facilities are aplenty in this part of Cornwall. Self-catering cottages, hotels and inns offer a variety of accommodative facilities. The small but active St Mawes fishing fleet contributes greatly to the local menus much to the delight of the locals and visitors. Those who enjoy fishing are sure to find the numerous shoreline angling, river and offshore fishing activities thrilling at St Mawes.

St Mawes is a great location for exploring minds and a well-deserved respite from a hectic lifestyle. St Mawes’ coastline can do wonders to your body, mind and soul as its modern facilities blend elegantly with its traditional backdrop.

Weddings and special occasions can be made exquisite and extremely memorable, if conducted at the St Mawes Castle. It offers a spectacular view of the picturesque surroundings and even a casual exploration of the premises will prove to be fulfilling, as all the floors in the castle are open for viewing purposes.

Travelling by foot around St Mawes will also be worthwhile as the inland paths expose the rugged but untouched beauty of the wild flora and fauna. Most of the species found here do not exist elsewhere, thus makSt Mawes Castleing it a definitely unique experience. An afternoon stroll down to the seafront which leads to the coastal walk will surely be refreshing and rejuvenating, amidst the pleasing cries of the sea gulls and splashing waves. Swimming and sunbathing is a common favorite of visitors and locals alike in St Mawes.

The historical magnificence of the clover shaped St Mawes Castle can be relished from one of the beaches. Depending on your fancy you may either opt for a cruise or a ferry, to get a much better view of this part of Cornwall.

The best preserved and most elaborately decorated of Henry VIII's
coastal fortresses, St Mawes was built to counter invasion threats from
France and Spain. Its counterpart is Pendennis, on the other side of
the Fal estuary.The clover-leaf shaped fort fell easily to
landward attack by Parliamentarian forces in 1646, and was not properly
refortified until the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Other coastal
forts built by Henry VIII include Portland, Deal and Walmer Castles.

St Mawes is undoubtedly a marvelous holiday destination for those who love to combine, leisure, adventure and sporting activities in their agenda.

 

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